A contractual dispute between Miller Brewing Company (MBC) and Molson Coors is heading to court after settlement talks between the two broke down.

The case centres on an attempt by MBC, the Canadian unit of SABMiller, to cancel Molson Coors' contract to handle its brands, including Miller Genuine Draft, in Canada. Molson moved to stop this by obtaining a temporary injunciton to block MBC ending the tie-up last June.

The dispute was due to be heard in a Toronto court in December, but the companies secured an adjournment in a bid to settle the matter out of court.

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Quenching your thirst with a frosty can of brew this summer may be in jeopardy due to a seven-month strike at Toronto-based Crown Holdings. Unionized workers will be protesting in front of Labatt Brewery in London on Thursday (April 10) from 8 a.m. to noon.

According to a union representative, on Sept. 6, 120 members of USW Local 9176 at Crown Holdings were forced on strike. The labour dispute resulted from Crown Holdings trying to implement a new 2-Tier wage structure where new hires would permanently earn up to 42 percent less (up to $9/hour) for doing the same work as existing workers. Adding fuel to the union’s fire is the fact Crown’s income almost doubled to $557 million in 2012 from $282 million in 2011. The company, based in the United States, operates 149 plants in 41 countries, employing around 21,900 employees.

The disagreement with Ambev’s Profit-Sharing Plan (PLR) and the company’s refusal to sit down and negotiate with the workers resulted, last Monday 24th, in the brewery workers calling a strike in the Jacareí plant.

Talking with the IUF, Valter Gildo da Silva, Press Office coordinator of the São José dos Campos and Region Food Workers Union, which represents Ambev workers, said that they have been campaigning on this subject for years.

Germany’s Federal Cartel Office (FCO) has handed out another EUR231.2m (US$318.9m) of fines to six more brewers in the country over alleged price fixing. In a statement on 2 Apri, the authority named the brewers found guilty of "illegal price fixing agreements" as Carlsberg, Radeberger, Bolten, Erzquell, Buffet and Gaff. The Association of Rhine-Westphalian Breweries and seven individuals were also fined.

Anheuser-Busch InBev has finalised its US$5.3bn repurchase of South Korea's Oriental Brewery (OB). The Belgium-headquartered group had sold OB to private equity firm Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co (KKR) and Affinity Equity in 2009 for $1.8bn. But in January this year, A-B InBev confirmed plans to exercise its buyback option to reacquire the brewer, South Korea's biggest beer producer.

AB InBev reported a $2.52 billion profit in the fourth quarter, up from $1.74 billion a year earlier, and sales rose 4.6 percent to $11.7 billion.

The company expects to see an extra boost due to better global growth and the World Cup, especially in Brazil. Meanwhile the IUF affiliated National Confederation of Workers in the Food and Allied (CNTA) launched a national campaign to combat occupational accidents and occupational diseases in beverages sector on February 20, 2014.

The Belgium-based company, whose North American headquarters is in St. Louis has extended a contract with the IUF affiliated International Brotherhood of Teamsters union in the U.S. another month as negotiations continue.

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The National Confederation of Workers in the Food and Allied (CNTA) launched a national campaign to combat occupational accidents and occupational diseases in breweries and beverages sector on February 20, 2014 in São Paulo. Some 50 leaders of federations and unions of workers in beverage sector who have registered complaints on occupational health and safety issues discussed alternatives for preventing and combating accidents and illnesses in workplaces. The development of a specific regulatory standard for the industry was one of the main demands of the workers. It was reported that between 2010 and 2012, there were 16,848 accidents in the sector, with 42 deaths in the same period.

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The union representing striking workers at a Toronto can manufacturing plant says the six-month job action is “threatening reliable supplies” of drink containers for beer makers like Molson Coors Brewing Co.

According to the United Steelworkers (USW) union, the ongoing strike—and the use of replacement workers—at Crown Holdings, Inc.’s plant in Toronto is causing headaches for beer makers Molson Coors and Labatt Brewing Co., as well as Canadian soft drink maker Cott Corp.

“We believe that using replacement workers is causing problems with quality control, shipment returns and failed efforts to operate the plant,” Lawrence Hay, a USW representative, said in a statement released by the union.

The union said beer makers are “particularly vulnerable” to potential supply disruptions as they head into the busy spring and summer season